Archive for the ‘Linux’ Category

Windows Server 2008 R2 backup (wbadmin)

It’s a long time since I dont’ write… Many things happened and many more coming..

This is just a small note to remember a couple of interesting links related to Windows Server 2008 R2 backup utility (wbadmin) troubles you may have. This blog article is a good starting point for having an idea on the problem.

If you try to backup your data to a network location hosted on a Linux-based system (but I think this problem can be found also elsewhere), wbadmin could fail with the following error:

The requested operation could not be completed
due to a file system limitation.

This happens only if you try to backup only some directories and not the entire disk(s) you have. Why this problem? This is related in how Linux manage sparse files, required for such a backup. This link explains the problem in details and a way to solve it, supposing you can modify Samba configuration on target machine. If you cannot modify your configuration, you have to backup the entire disk instead of single directories.

More information on sparse files can be found in the documentation of fsutil command.

Advertisements

rsync to non standard port

It’s a long time since I don’t write on my blog… so just a simple post to help me remember a non standard rsync command syntax.

rsync is a powerful synchronization tool, that could help to perform a fast-and-secure backup of files and folder to a remote server. Usually rsync uses ssh to connect to the remote server, thus transfers are secure. But rsync relies on standard ssh configuration to connect to that server. What happens if you changed, for instance,  ssh daemon listen port?

rsync has a command line option to specify what kind of remote shell you would use to connect to the server. This way you can specify the non standard port to connect to. Say you want to transfer all *.tar.gz files from local directory to the remote server myremoteserver, using ssh shell connecting to port 1234 with user user. The command line you have to use is the following:

rsync --progress -vrae 'ssh -p 1234' *.tar.gz user@myremoteserver:/path/to/remote/directory

The only pitfall on this command is you’ll be asked for a connection password, so you cannot schedule this command to be executed automatically. But I know there is a way to logon automatically, providing the local system with a certificate to access the remote system. I’ll write more on this in the next day.